Nissan e-NV200 Ice Cream Can Concept

Nissan has taken the ICE (internal combustion engine) out of the ice cream van, creating an all-electric, zero-emission concept for ‘Clean Air Day’ in the UK on June 20th.

Nissan-e-NV200-Ice-Cream-Van

Nissan partnered with Mackie’s of Scotland, an ice cream producer powering its family-owned dairy farm by renewable wind and solar energy. The project demonstrates how a ‘Sky to Scoop’ approach can remove carbon dependence at every stage of the ice cream journey.

The prototype van is based on the e-NV200, Nissan’s 100% electric LCV (light commercial vehicle). The concept is a working demonstration of Nissan’s Electric Ecosystem, combining a zero-emission drivetrain, second-life battery storage and renewable solar energy generation.

Whilst the van’s motor is driven by a 40kWh battery, the on-board ice cream equipment, including a soft-serve machine, freezer drawer and drinks fridge, are powered by the newly unveiled Nissan Energy ROAM, which goes on sale later in 2019.

Nissan e-NV200 Ice Cream Van: Detail

The e-NV200 has an all-electric driving range of up to 124-miles (WLTP Combined) between charges. The two Nissan Energy ROAM units have a combined storage capacity of 1.4kWh and can each output power at up to 1kW. They can be recharged either from a 230v mains supply (a full recharge takes about an hour), or the solar panel array on the van’s roof (a full recharge in 2-4 hours).

Payment can be by cash, but also contactless bank card and smartphones via a ‘tap-to-pay’ panel mounted on the side of the van.

Instead of a jingle to attract customers – not always popular with parents – the concept has a smart button that generates a tweet of the van’s precise location using the global addressing service What3Words.

Thanks to the e-NV200’s bi-directional charging capability, owners could even income through the winter – when the van is less frequently used. Through a V2G (Vehicle-to-Grid) charger, the e-NV200’s battery can be used to store surplus energy from the national grid (for example renewable wind and solar energy), and then provide it back to the grid when needed. This technology can help balance out the peaks in national energy demands, as well as providing EV owners with additional revenue from their vehicle when it’s not being driven.

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